Mar 14

A bit of discussion has been going on around the traps about Internet based file conversion apps. Zamzar-LogoZamzar and Media Convert allow you to convert files up to 100mb and 150mb respectively. To convert files one simply uploads a file from their hard drive or from a URL. There seems to be more of these tools coming online all the time. My concern is, if teachers are going to use them in the classroom where are these files being stored before and after conversion? With Terms of Service on the Media Convert site that contain grammatical flaws such as……

Lezard “Your are the only responsible for the data which it sends to Media-Convert servers. One is reminded that the illicit exchanges of recordings and protected works as well as the hacking harm artistic creation………Media-Convert is a free service, which does not offer any guarantee of any kind as for its use. You can use Media-Convert for any activity, personal or profesionnal. “

…. one doesn’t gain confidence in the service providers. So for me the jury is out on whether the usefulness of these tools is for you or for the convertor.

Has anyone used them with success?

   , ,

Mar 12

Picnik LogoWith Adobe’s announcement last week of it’s intention to produce a scaled down web-version of PhotoShop I thought I’d have a look at a couple of examples of what is out there already. Picnik and Snipshot a couple of web2.0 online image editors I’ve come across. Both of these apps have interfaces that are very intuitive and my gran could probably be left for 5 minutes Logo-Bigto work out how to use them.

Does anyone have any other examples of online image editors they’d like to share?

   , ,

Jan 29

The big question is - will schools be buying them for Wi-Fi (802.11b/g) access during excursions and outside work? You bet - at least those with money will. It wasn’t until I came across this video, I understood what the web community is so amazed about. Kindy kids will be able to understand and operate that GUI! This montage from Rojo sums the combination up for a visual spatial learners like me:
iPhone new

Unfortunately, being able to access rich media via the school WiFi network changes the boundaries for school ICT resources yet again. With the new wireless capabilities of hubs like AirPort Extreme digital portability enters yet another dimension - can our school infrastructure and systems keep up? This sort of change in expectation displays the need for scaleable network and storage solutions. Instead of portable notebook trolleys will we see racks of iPhones in the library? I’ll check back on this post in 2008 to see where we are at.

   , ,

Jan 28

Flipbooks This online service called FlipClip takes short-video clips and transforms them into small flip books traditionally the domain of quirky gift shops. This is an interesting way to share and preserve short clips your students make in the physical world - great for clay animation made with iStopMotion or for clips with subtitles in iMovie or Windows Movie Maker (NB: WMV files aren’t web2.0 friendly - AVI seems ok). Basically you upload 15 or 30 seconds of video to the website and select a book size. They print out several frames from your video and assemble a book which animates when flipped. Check out a short video clip here. Surprisingly they aren’t very expensive considering they are personalised. Pricing works out to AUD$11 per book, and $13.40 for postage. A bulk order of 25 books can be sent for the postage price of AUD$34. Some technical info from the FlipClip website:

The ideal resolution for a FlipClip is 640×480, and there are some great cameras available now that will record movies at that resolution or higher. Although FlipClips can be printed from any resolution video, short clips (under 30 seconds) at 320×240 or 640×480 are optimal. Frame rates aren’t as important, so you can safely record at 10 or 15 frames per second and still have a great looking FlipClip. FlipClips.com currently restricts the size of file uploads to 25 Megabytes, so you may want to edit your video’s length and, if possible, compress it before uploading. FlipClips are intended to be used for movies, where flipping the pages reveals the motion.

I can imagine they would look amazing with a slow motion clip such as this. As a recent recipient of some nifty cards from moo.com I am finding these web2.0 tools and their real world products a lot of fun.

[This post was cross-posted on AusMacEd]

   , , ,

Close
E-mail It