Tumbling through the blogosphere Attending an overseas conference with Twitter
Apr 23

If I could do any other job I would love to be an industrial designer. Lego was my labyrinth as a boy and the space shuttle was designed in my bedroom circa 1978. Yes, upstairs in a town house in Scotland mid-Thatcherism I landed a space-shuttle on an amazing car-park my Dad had made me out of plywood. I always had things in mind that might be of interest to others - useful designs as well as the whimsical. It is always pleasure to learn about the work of other designers, but even more interesting is what motivates them.

A fella I have a great deal of respect for, Bryn Jones has an eye for design too. He understands the ICT design elements at play in the world around him. Observing the appearance of ultraportables and touch-screen interfaces he predicted the new MacBook would look like Yves Behar’s design for the X02 back in December at a meeting of WUGWA. The elements of this sort of technology are becoming available all the time and cheaper at that. These designs need software though. There may be other moves towards similar designs in the IT industry. Examples are the widespread use of Ajax in web interfaces and revision of iMovie ‘08 which pre-empts for me the move to a touch screen interface with multi-media. The skim features fit nicely with the pinch features of a multi-touch interface. Exciting times to love design.

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My concerns with these pictures of the new X02 design are that the students aren’t shown to be creating content and that they are mostly passive receptors of content. And where is the built in camera, scanner and green-screen like the iSight? These X02’s need to be able to be used to create music, movies, 3D design and graphics. Extending students to help them develop higher-order thinking skills is not an easy task. Historically, teachers have looked to Bloom’s Taxonomy (1956) for assistance but this has proven to need rejigging for our times.

More recently, Anderson and Krathwohl (2001) have adapted Bloom’s model to fit the needs of today’s classroom by employing more outcome-oriented language, workable objectives, and changing nouns to active verbs (see this page).

Most notably, knowledge has been converted to remember. In addition, the highest level of development is create rather than evaluate.

In assessing effective contribution to learning, the design of these devices need to be seriously analysed for their ability to help students become content and knowledge creators rather than empty vestibules waiting to be filled. Let’s also not forget the most important part of the redisgn: OLPC has sacrificed its commitment to free software and is installing Windows.

The price tag of the Asus eePC, for example, is clearly attractive at first glance, but a closer look reveals it is a device that cannot even run that dog of a program Windows MovieMaker (see the flip-side here). Unless the kids can tell their story effectively and be given a stage for their creative ideas these devices will lose their novelty within a month. Still there is hope! When asked in an ideal world, “what is your single greatest hope for this project?”, Nicholas Negroponte founder of the OLPC Project replied:

A three-step hope: World peace through the elimination of poverty through education through learning. Education is the goal; learning is the means. A lot of learning can happen without teaching. We’re banking on that.

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2 Responses to “Designing for the world around us”

  1. Daddage Says:

    It wasn’t a carpark! A 2 storey garage, with car-wash and 2 ramp that you refused to adhere to son! Shades of the Thatcherism discontent perchance!

  2. Bryn Jones Says:

    Hi Paul

    The current OLPC has a camera and mike so I would expect the next model to have them. I was quite surprised to see how much had been squeezed into the OLPC when I got a look at one last year.

    There will be a lab of them at the VITTA Conference in Melbourne in November
    Shift Happens
    http://www.vitta.org.au/conferenceinfo

    Regards

    Bryn

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